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The art of landing a trophy steelhead with a 13′ Rapala drift outfit without a net.

Posted on May 7th, 2014
Aaron puts "maximum-pressure" on his trophy steelhead by holding his fishing rod at the 12 o'clock position to maximize the torque the rod can exert.
Aaron puts “maximum-pressure” on his trophy steelhead by holding his fishing rod at the 12 o’clock position to maximize the torque the rod can exert.

I took these images of Aaron doing an expert job fighting and landing a trophy steelhead without a net. I watched as Aaron hooked this nice steelhead and proceeded to expertly fight it.  You can see from how high he is holding his fishing rod (almost at the one o’clock position to maximize the “torque” the Rapala 13′ Drift Rod is designed to put on a fish even when using light line.  Many anglers fight a fish with their rod to parallel to the water and don’t take advantage of the rods spine-energy.

[nggallery id=935]Aaron has lot’s of experience landing big steelhead on light line and always keeps his cool and fights the fish with confidence letting it take line when it wants to run, than picking up the line fast when it rests.  When a fight is close to being finished it’s important not to let-off on the pressure to prevent the fish from making a fast run back to the main current.

This trophy steelhead fought hard on light line.
This trophy steelhead fought hard on light line.

The moment of triumph.  After a patient fight, Aaron holds up his trophy steelhead quickly getting it back to the water, letting it revive and releasing it….well done Aaron!

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