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Spring means stream trout & sucker fishing.

Posted on April 21st, 2014
Suckers are plentiful in most of our Great Lakes and surrounding waters, but are only intercepted by anglers in high numbers in the spring when they migrate up tributaries to spawn.  The rest of the year they roam the open lake bottom and are seldom caught.
Suckers are plentiful in most of our Great Lakes and surrounding waters, but are only intercepted by anglers in high numbers in the spring when they migrate up tributaries to spawn. The rest of the year they roam the open lake bottom and are seldom caught.

My wife Barbara, our pup Mulligan & I had a chance to check-out the Lake Ontario tributary fishing.  As everyone would agree, we had great weather for our Easter long-weekend and many people took advantage of their holiday and nice weather to go fishing! Water levels in many of the tributaries were either back o normal and clear, or still high and clearing. Many of the steelhead have moved up the waterways and now are spawning.  Anglers we saw and talked to reported “slow fishing” for the rainbows, but many of them were hooking and landing suckers.  Normally when the sucker bit is “on” in the lower “all-year” steelhead open stretches of tributaries, it also means the steelhead have moved through.

Anglers will now have to patiently wait for opening day of trout season when many steelhead should still be spawning and also dropping back from the headwaters to the lower sections of all tributaries.  Looks like we are in for an excellent opening day/week for trout fishing!

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