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May steelhead action continues in Lake Ontario tributaries.

Posted on May 4th, 2014

italo_steelhead2Aaron Shirley, our pup Mulligan and I had a great time steelhead fishing Lake Ontario tributaries with our Rapala Drift Outfits.  We matched our  11? Rapala R-Type drift rods with Rapala drift reels, Sufix Tritanium andSufix Seige 8 lb. test main line and Sufix 6 lb. test fluorocarbon leaders with #10 Gamakatsu Octopus hooks with sensitive 4 gram floats and fished treated trout egg-sacks.

[nggallery id=931]I took these sequence shots of Aaron fighting a really nice size spawned out female which he successfully landed, posed for the camera and released it quickly….well don Aaron!

aaron_steelhead2Both Aaron & I had fun catching and releasing some nice post-spawn steelhead.  When steelhead start dropping-back to the Great Lakes they are usually skinny (having lost quite a bit of their body mass from spawning/eggs), and they become very acrobatic.

italo_steelheadDrop-back steelhead can really school up in larger pools but they can also get very spooky and line shy.  A stealthy approach to a pool helps, and making a long drift to a productive spool with the aid of a drift-outfit really helps to ensure fish taking your well presented egg-sack on almost every drift!

 

Bloodroot has a single leaf that is heavily lobed. The curling of the leaf around the flower stalk is also a key characteristic. The flowers will open in another day or two and they are very fragile and will not last long.  Another day or two after they open is about it for them so its a real treat to see them in bloom. Derek Konieczny, Georgetown, ON
Bloodroot has a single leaf that is heavily lobed. The curling of the leaf around the flower stalk is also a key characteristic. The flowers will open in another day or two and they are very fragile and will not last long. Another day or two after they open is about it for them so its a real treat to see them in bloom. Derek Konieczny, Georgetown, ON


It is evident in nature that we have a late spring.  I took a picture of these Bloodroot that have still not bloomed….maybe in the next few days!

One of my favorite trout/salmon egg pickling recipe is as follows:

  • 1 cup scraped/skeened or loose salmon or trout eggs (do not wash)
  • 5-table spoons of powdered Borax
  • 3-table spoons fine pickling salt
  • 1/4 cup unrefined brown sugar

I take the above and mix them in a tray, adding the Borax first letting the eggs absorb it for a few hours.  Than I add the pickling salt and again stir well and I let it sit for a couple of hours.  Lastly I add the brown sugar, mix it well and let it set in the fridge. Each day I mix the eggs gently to make sure they all come in contact with the ingredients.  I find it’s best to keep the eggs in a flatter (as opposed to a high) container where they eggs don’t put too much weight on themselves.  They are ready to tie the next day and will keep for months in the fridge…..and they work great!!

 

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