Italo’s Blog

131

Prime Time for Trophy Sheepshead.

Posted on Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Over the last few days I have been fishing from Lake Erie, NY to the Bay of Quinte, Belleville and I have seen quite a few number of sheepshead move into areas I normally catch bass (Lake Erie, NY), and walleye (Quinte).  I have been fishing lures along shorelines and weedbeds as deep as 30′ and started to catch quite a few sheepshead, some of which have been up over 15 lb.  I know not too many people get excited over hooking sheepshead, but when you are casting and retrieving artificials with light spinning and baitcasting gear, it’s a lot of fun!  If you are fishing Lake Erie and Lake Ontario shallows over the next few weeks, don’t be surprised if you tie into one of these hard-fighting fish.

[nggallery id=8]

Posted in:   Italo’s Blog
Like me   Follow Me  
Subscribe youtube   Newsletter Subscriber   InstagramFollow in instagram
131

Rapala Husky Jerk produces trophy Lake Erie, NY Smallmouth Bass.

Posted on Saturday, June 13, 2009

Tony Brecknock, John Cowie and I targeted “post-spawn”, trophy smallmouth bass on the NY side of Lake Erie yesterday.   Conditions at 8am where cool and overcast as we headed across Lake Erie to the NY-side.

[singlepic id=18 w=320 h=240 float=]

It took as about 1/2 hr. to locate some big smallmouth bass, but as soon as we did, John Cowie and Tony Brecknock hooked a double-header.  Tonys fish ended up being the biggest fish of the day.

To our surprise, over the last week weeds had grown several feet high in 7-12′ of water making it challenging to fish the Rapala Husky Jerk #13 without getting weeds on the lure.

[singlepic id=22 w=320 h=240 float=]

Twitching with stiffer Rapala R-Type & ST2 rods along with the Rapala Taitanium Line made it easy for us to “rip” the Husky Jerk right through the weeds.

[singlepic id=24 w=320 h=240 float=]

John Cowie also landed a chunky largemouth bass that was mixed-in with the smallmouth.

[singlepic id=23 w=320 h=240 float=]

In addition to catching the smallmouth & largemouth bass, we ended up also  catching sheepshead, pike, and rock bass. Lake Erie water are still pretty cool around the 59C range on most in-shore shoals and reefs.

[singlepic id=19 w=320 h=240 float=]

As surface water temperatures warm-up, it should make for excellent top-water fishing for smallmouth bass!

[singlepic id=20 w=320 h=240 float=][singlepic id=21 w=320 h=240 float=]

Posted in:   Italo’s Blog
Like me   Follow Me  
Subscribe youtube   Newsletter Subscriber   InstagramFollow in instagram
131

Youth to fight invading species again this summer

Posted on Friday, June 12, 2009
OFAH FILE: 842
June 11, 2009
For Immediate Release

All media are invited to attend the workshop for photo, video and interview opportunities or follow up with local students

Youth to fight invading species again this summer
Students from across Ontario gather for training June 16, 17

More than thirty college and university summer students will attend invasive species summer school next week to learn all they can about alien threats to Ontario’s environment, and what they can do to prevent their spread. The Invading Species Awareness Program, a partnership of the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters (O.F.A.H.), and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (M.N.R.), is hosting the workshop. It will be held June 16, 17 at Trent University in Peterborough.

The students are employed for the summer with a variety of organizations, including the O.F.A.H., M.N.R., conservation authorities, First Nations and non-government organizations. There will be students attending from 20 different natural resource offices located across the province. Over the summer, the students will form an “invasive species hit squad,” and will attend community events in their area to educate the public about invading species and the steps that they can take to stop them from spreading to new places.

The purpose of the workshop is to provide the students with helpful information to ensure that they have a successful summer season of public education and outreach, and invasive species monitoring.

The Government of Canada’s Canada Summer Jobs Program is also providing funding assistance for this initiative.

Who: 35 college and university summer students
What: Invading Species Awareness Training
When: June 16, 9 am – 5pm (Note: At 1 p.m. move outside)
June 17, 8 am – 1 pm
Where: Trent University, Environmental Sciences building, Peterborough

With 100,000 members, subscribers and supporters, and 660 member clubs, the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters is the largest nonprofit conservation-based organization in Ontario.

For more information, visit www.ofah.org or www.invadingspecies.com.

The following host communities and organizations are involved in the summer student program. To be put in touch with students, or for further information, call Francine MacDonald, O.F.A.H. Invasive Species/Aquatics Biologist (ext 238), or Allyson Brown (ext 276), Invasive Species Outreach Liaison at (705) 748-6324.

Eastern Ontario:
Chutes a Blondeau, Voyageur Provincial Park, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Finch, South Nation Conservation
Lanark, Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority
Lanark, Plenty Canada
Manotick, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
Pembroke, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Prince Edward County, Prince Edward Stewardship Council

Northeastern Ontario:
Chapleau, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Espanola, Manitoulin Island, Manitoulin Area Stewardship Council, Manitoulin Tourism Association
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

Northwestern Ontario:
Fort Frances, South Kenora Rainy River Stewardship Council
Kenora, Lake of the Woods District Property Owners Association
Nipigon, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Thunder Bay, Thunder Bay Stewardship Council

Central Ontario:
Alliston, Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority
Aurora, Ontario Streams
Orillia, Kids For Turtles Environmental Education
Peterborough, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
Trenton, Lower Trent Conservation

Southwestern Ontario:
Windsor, University of Windsor

-30-

Contact

Francine MacDonald
Invading Species/Aquatic Biologist
705-748-6324 ext 238
cell 705-761-1503
Allyson Brown
Invasive Species Outreach Liaison
705-748-6324 ext 276
Posted in:   Italo’s Blog
Like me   Follow Me  
Subscribe youtube   Newsletter Subscriber   InstagramFollow in instagram
131

This Weekend on TSN, Steelhead Fishing the Niagara River, ON.

Posted on Wednesday, June 10, 2009

italo_tsn_cs23_01On this week’s TSN program Italo takes you steelhead fishing on the Niagara River, ON and shows you how to catch trophy migratory rainbow trout using 3-way rigs, light line and the www.slimers.ca , in-organic flesh bait.

Posted in:   Italo’s Blog
Like me   Follow Me  
Subscribe youtube   Newsletter Subscriber   InstagramFollow in instagram
131

Lower Grand River, ON Update.

Posted on Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Kam Anderson holds up his first carp ever....not a bad size fish to catch on a 1/8 oz. jig, 6 lb. test line and an ultralight Rapala rod/reel combo!
Kam Anderson holds up his first carp ever....not a bad size fish to catch on a 1/8 oz. jig, 6 lb. test line and an ultralight Rapala rod/reel combo!

 

 

 

 

 

I fished the Lower Grand River today with my friends Kam Anderson and John Waind to check-out the conditions for walleye.  Anglers up to yesterday have had good success trolling the Grand River south of Dunnville, ON for eating-size walleye.   Unfortunately we received some heavy rainfall last night and the Grand River was high and muddy this morning.  Talking to anglers fishing below the Dam, not even the sheepshead were biting.  We worked 1/8 & 1/4 oz. jigs/plastic grubs along the bottom in water ranging from 5-15′ deep and also cranked with the new Rapala DT Thug.  We did manage to catch a carp and a few sheepshead, but no walleye.  As soon as the water clears-up anglers will once again be catching walleye.

 

 

Posted in:   Italo’s Blog
Like me   Follow Me  
Subscribe youtube   Newsletter Subscriber   InstagramFollow in instagram